The Trashalanche Pokemon Podcast

The Dan Hugar Episode! Indy! Corviknight, Togekiss, Inteleon, Arceus, all the best Pokemon!

May 09, 2022 Brent Halliburton Season 1 Episode 85
The Trashalanche Pokemon Podcast
The Dan Hugar Episode! Indy! Corviknight, Togekiss, Inteleon, Arceus, all the best Pokemon!
Transcript
Mike:

And what's up.

Brit:

Oh,

Dan:

for letting me join.

Brit:

yeah, of course.

Mike:

been a long, it's been a long time coming. so,

Dan:

I appreciate it.

Mike:

yeah, no, this is cool. Cool to have you. And it like it worked out. Cause I think like, Hey, you did well, which is awesome. And B we kind of have like two weeks to fill now. And whenever we have two weeks to fill at the same material, it. can get a little repetitive. So I feel like today we can do like a real solid Indy recap. And then next week we can talk about New Jersey prep.

Dan:

Awesome.

Brent:

My son is sitting in the corner watching us record the pod because,

Dan:

Oh,

Brent:

uh, now that Pokemon tournaments have resumed, he's actually like, I, my, you know, as you probably heard, my running joke is he takes a big interest right after the tournament in testing, like he's, he's, he gets excited about playing and then he's like, now let's play. And I'm like, oh, if only we could have captured that excitement before. So like now he's like, okay, it's like, Pokemon is really back. It's like, go time. You know, he's like, he's listened to like six pods in a row and I'm like, dude, you should go listen to other people's files

Dan:

I will say for me, after

Brent:

you've listened to other people's podcasts. He was like, no, That's my son. He's

Dan:

you guys had me on, so this is by far my favorite at this point. So you got a fan, at

Brit:

Oh sex.

Dan:

the, uh, no, I was going to say so for me after tournaments, it's either I'm so pumped, like after Collinsville right before the world. On the Amtrak home in Chicago, I was playing games on PTCGO because I wanted to like, stick with it and like, get rolling. And then for instance, after UIC this year, I'm just, I'm not touching a Pokemon card for at least 72 hours. Cause I hate this game and it's a horrible game. I'd never want to play it again.

Brent:

Welcome to the Trashalanche man. You know, I had a like funny zing, each thing that I used to say, and I like deleted it from the doc and now I don't know what it was, but it was something about how, where the best Pokemon podcast or something like that. It's really good. Attendance is to 106 hundred and 66%, 200%, 250%.

Mike:

You count on your son.

Brent:

Yeah. That's where I was going. So we got, we got Mike Fouchet at Mike Fouchet Twitter. We have me be Halliburton on Twitter. We have Brett Pybas his wives on Twitter. Uh, we have Dan huger, not on Twitter,

Dan:

Now that sweater only.

Brent:

not, not on Twitter. And we have my son sitting in the corner, Liam Halliburton, Liam Halliburton on. And he's trying to get some followers so you can follow him. And then I'll have like two followers, uh, is a teenager. So this is the worst part of the whole podcast for him. Um, so, uh, record attendance, um, responsive our channel firewall. They help, uh, pay the bills and we appreciate them very much. If you use code trash, you're probably thinking about buying Pokemon cards coming out of that. You could use code trash and that gets you like a couple of 5% discounts, something like that, whatever the channel fireball discount is, and everybody remembers Mike's roaring endorsement of the channel fireball marketplace from last week.

Mike:

The cards came good condition relatively fast. I have a couple of decks built now, so I can actually play in New Jersey. It was, it was great.

Brent:

Very exciting. Uh, Dan, you will be very sad to hear no more five star reviews. It's been a while since we had a five star.

Dan:

People are missing out.

Brent:

Yeah. Yeah. And then, and then in the show notes, I have the Dan we have not forgotten you. And lo it has happened

Dan:

I feel very loved. Thanks guys.

Mike:

Dan, you wanna just tell us a little bit about yourself generally before we get into current specifics.

Dan:

Yeah, absolutely. So, hi, I'm Dan. I started playing, I played Pokemon go as a kid, played a little bit in grad school, and then I started playing competitively in 2018, right. And started like celestial storm and all that. COVID kind of cut off my second season of attempting to get my invite and it was going significantly better than my first season. So I, uh, my probably only notable stuff is I got global top 16 and two of the players cups. And then I've been slowly working my way towards getting my invite. So here I am,

Mike:

We played right at, uh, Philly. Regionals.

Dan:

very first regional you and I played, yes,

Mike:

yeah, yeah. Yeah. I, I vaguely remember. Um, I play, I was playing like Zoroark I think what were

Dan:

no, you were playing the past Simeon Tapu,

Mike:

Oh, Ray Ray, where I was going to play Zoroark and then someone convinced me to switch to pissing me in last minute. Not a good, not a good choice. What did you play?

Dan:

I was playing Vickery, so it was an excellent choice for our round, but I think we ended up tying by some miracles. So I was, I was pretty happy.

Mike:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. Okay. Yeah, that was, that was cool. Um, yeah. And I remember seeing your name, uh, during players cups the last couple of years. So that's pretty sweet. What did you play in the players cups that you qualified for?

Dan:

Um, player's cup one. I played Dragapult just straight up consistent Dragapult cause it was fun. And honestly, I was trying to stretch myself as a player because it's still relatively new learning. How to place damage counters. You mess up a single counter. You lose the game was good practice. And then I played peek around for top 16, north America and the third one because he ground. then in the fourth one, I played Pikarom again, because I just had no other deck that felt like I could do anything where people are on my head decisions. So it was fun. Worked out.

Mike:

be grounds. Great. We're big fans of peek around here, as you know,

Dan:

Yes. Yes.

Brent:

the podcast.

Mike:

Cool. All right. So let's talk about indeed, where you guys want to start.

Brit:

I don't know. I guess I, it wasn't something I think I forgot to put it in the agenda, but just like in general, I've just been so very, very, very impressed. Like every, every look at every single tournament that's happened since we've been back and just like, look at the players that are doing well. Like I just think we're, and I don't look at it and I think we may have hit something like this before. I don't know if I like it. Like, it's a hard format, but it's clearly a very good one at the same time too. Um, there's some like frustrating parts, like RCS, it's just like, so like, just so embarrassingly efficient, like, you know, Efficiency was 60 for one, you know, RCS does 200 damage for, to search your deck for three energy cards, search your deck for any two car. It gets it's just nuts, but it's really, really great to see just, and again, all three of the regionals this weekend, all of their regionals, all over the world, this is true for. Um, that's just really, really great. And just for how much, I guess, just for how much, like, we've talked about you, it's just like, I think really settled on just being like a good deck, but not one that really needs to be in this conversation of like band worthy or not, which is nice to see. I know like, like I understand the appeals of those conversations. I think like something about online era, something about really just the way that like gaming has progressed. I think we just like always, we're all, it's just like the Nerf culture, right? Like we just, we don't we're, we're not as patient in our adaptations anymore. We're just like ask, just fix it. Just make it worse. Like instead of just trying to learn with it. And that's just like, I think again, just another Testament to the form.

Brent:

The thing that really really jumped out at me was despite the fact that yeah, like RCS and mew are these like crazy decks with abilities, uh, to, to just like turbo, like few decks we've ever seen before. It seems like a really skill intensive format. Like people talk about how, like there's a big difference between the really good new players and people playing mew. And I know in my play testing, I'm like, Hmm, I'm just, I'm just playing this. I'm not like I'm not Natalie, whatever it is. Right. Th there's, there's just a huge gap between the really good players and the people who are playing a deck. And there's a huge gap between people who are playing RCS Inteleon and people who are like really like trying to win the tournament, you know, and like all these decks. Um, it just, uh, uh, astounds me the difference in like the way you play, like playing rapid striker. Urshifu I mean, people are intimidated by the skill cap. Like people can plop down and just play the deck and then they get run over and they're like, this deck is problematic, but like, if you're really good, you get really far with a lot of.

Dan:

So I played, I saw, I played nine rounds statement. Obviously I played five RC stacks, but I played five completely unique RCS stacks. Like they had some of the similarities, but one was fly gone. One was a Beedrill Sandaconda. One was just RC to start. One had Lycanroc VMX one had rallied on it just, it was RCS, but it was just such a variety. That was really cool. Cause every game was very different based on what they had and what they were.

Brent:

Yeah. Uh, um, and even like, I think one of the things that's probably we're talking about it is I felt like there was more whimsical than maybe people expected. And I think the funny thing that I got, the impression of like watching seniors and juniors was, I mean, maybe it's Presley Whimsicott seemed like the low skilled care.

Mike:

Yeah, it seems like a really good deck. If you're not feeling it, it's like a matchup deck right there. We see those in a lot of formats where you have this deck that pretty straightforward. And if you hit the good match-ups, you do great. If you don't hit your good match-ups, you're not going to do too poorly, but it seems like a great choice for someone that, uh, is maybe just coming back into the game. It doesn't really know where to start

Brent:

Yeah, like there's, there's only one attack you're going to use you, like, you know, you look at your hand and you play a bunch of items, then you draw some cards with Debra role and you play those items and then you like attack with weapons, the cat.

Mike:

Yeah. So one just one quick thing that I'll add is that I was intimidated by the Urshifu deck at first, but now I've played maybe like 10 to 15 games with it. And I've realized that while it is quite hard to play, it's not that much harder to play than mew and RCS. And so I think that's kind of a Testament to what you guys are saying. Every all the really good decks are pretty complex and have lots of different lines. Um, so you don't need to necessarily get intimidated by any single one. You just kinda gotta pick one and go for it and play a bunch of games. And that's the only way you're gonna get better at this format. So, so you've mentioned Whimsicott had more play than you thought it would. I think I saw there was like eight or nine maybe in day two, which is like reasonable. That's probably about what I expected maybe a little bit more, but the big thing, the big anomaly here is very, very little Urshifu in day two. And so my question to you on the ground, is that more a function of there just wasn't a lot of Urshifu in general or is it. that Urshifu did really poorly? Yeah.

Dan:

I guess for me, I didn't play in her food and I didn't sit next to an Urshifu the whole, the whole day. So it just

Brit:

that was, that was the biggest surprise. I think for me, I don't have a, I haven't looked at the data to know how much of this is just anecdotal or not. But yeah, I just, I didn't, I did not sit next to one eye. I knew a couple of people that played it. Like I knew several good players that played it, but I just did not see it at all. Um, which was very strange to me because it didn't seem like it didn't seem like the metagame had shifted like a purely to counter or anything like that. So I, I was very surprised to see that, um, Not being popular. I expected it to be one of the more popular decks, if not like top two or three, or like maybe like after mew and outside of just like all the RCS Islam together being the most popular.

Brent:

Um, so, I mean, I think we talked last week. That was really the deck that my son was on. Uh, um, he had played a lot of games with Urshifu and, you know, I know Frank had said he felt like. Uh, you know, the RCS spectrum was not a particularly good matchup on the pod. And he was saying that, you know, people are gonna play hoop a B, and like, it's a pretty good card. I think, uh, as Dan said, like a lot of people play it a lot of different texts, but I think the thing we ended up switching decks at the last minute, because we experienced testing anxiety, um, like our testing partners found that like, if they played RCS and they played like a Manaphy and a Dunsparce and a big charm, it was pretty difficult to put yourself in a situation where you could ever do the thing.

Mike:

Like yoga with Manaphy or Dunsparce you mean? Cause you, you just put the charm on one of them.

Brent:

exactly. And, and like, uh, I mean, I think when you look at the decks that I'm doing well, I feel like a lot of people found a lot of different ways that they felt like they kind of got to a place where they were countering. Whether it was Hoopa or like some people didn't play the Manaphy, but the Dunsparce big charm. Some play, some people didn't play the Dunsparce, but they play the Manaphy big charm. Like it just turned out. I think people kind of tech pretty hard for it. And I think one thing that'll be interesting is, you know, will people go away from that and Secaucus because they felt like they didn't get value in Indy. I don't know. I mean, obviously Lista played that card did well. So people that are just like net decking lists, they'll be like, I complained Dunsparce I'm playing Manaphy I'm I'm doing whatever that thing is. But like, yeah, I think there was very little Urshifu because people are building RCS techs were taking to defeat it. So like when you tested that matchup, you were like, wow, this matchup.

Mike:

Yeah, that makes sense. I did see quite a lot of lists playing Hoopa pro pretty much every RCS list that played dark energy that I saw that did somewhat well ran Hoopa. And I feel like that is probably. More important than, or more impactful perhaps than Dunsparce or Manaphy, um, just cause it gives you such an aggressive way to deal with an our issue Urshifu immediately. Um, so I guess that kinda makes sense. And I guess it kind of begs the question, like you said, what, what are these decks going to do now? That Urshifu was totally absent essentially from the metagame and either way, what does that mean for Urshifu as a place. You know, in a couple of weeks, cause we still saw toward do very well in Bilbao. He got second, uh, I kinda was followed him on Twitter. Like he played against RCS decks that ran Hoopa and Dunsparce and Manaphy and he was doing okay, so, but that's toward, um, so I don't know if, uh, you know, or regular issue player can deal with all of those consistently, you know, round after round. Um, but that I could still find Pedro also did well with it. I think those were really the only two notable, there was three that made top 32 there in, uh, in Europe, but Yeah. Okay. So that's interesting. That was kind of one of my big Um,

Brent:

Yeah. And that's like, we're talking about like two of the best players in the world that are like, like they're the only people that had success with Urshifu, uh, this past weekend.

Mike:

Yeah. And, and, and the tournament in Brazil is zero or two in the top 16.

Brent:

Yeah.

Mike:

kind of the same story going on there.

Brent:

Yeah, I saw focused at tweet and I thought that this was a, really the, the, a answer to the question. It was like there were eight mew in top eight at all these tournaments and everything else was RCS

Mike:

yeah.

Brent:

and every, and ever like, what that really means is there were 16 other RCS. And I think to Dan's point, that meant there were like three or four variants. Um, right. Some played Beedrill like Pablo played on like super vanilla, uh, RCS Inteleon lists like a lot of different ways to build it. But, uh, so MYU has like 33% of the Medishare like still the best deck, one of the best facts. And then our sister.

Mike:

So like what, what, what w what do we do against our, like, I feel like we're kind of in this, uh, like w when Zoroark was big, people will always ask, like, how do you counter Zoroark? And the answer is you can't really, because it's, there's just so many versions. You can maybe like, you know, gain some edges here and there against certain variants. And I feel like we're kind of in the same spot against RCS. Like there's no, there's no clear deck now that feels, oh, yes. I'm favored against multiple RCTs barriers. Um, I don't know. It's very weird.

Brent:

You know, one of the things that, uh, as one of the things that really occurred to me as I was looking at lists, I want to get you guys' reaction was, um, no, I, I feel like, uh, uh, Yeah, I wrote, I wrote a zillion articles, six prizes, where I talked about like hypergeometric distribution and trying to make sure that people have like, consistent decks, that draw pretty well. And like, you look at the list now and they play like four draws supporters.

Mike:

Yeah. Why did, why play dress butter? When you have double computer search as an ability, man.

Brent:

Right, right. Like, uh, and I don't know if, if any of you like, thought about how you look at a deck and figure out if it's consistent. Like, so Liam had an Urshifu list that he felt like he was comfortable with, but he felt like it was inconsistent. And that was why we kind of ended up going off it. Right. He was like the, you know, we put a scrapper in and we were like, you do all these things and you could potentially get it, but you need like a seven piece combo. You just don't always get there. Um, but I just wondered how people look at consistency when they build decks now. Cause they must look at it differently. It's not like. For four junipers, four N's for Tapu Layla four ultra balls. And you're like, it's super consistent. It's apparently a completely different thing now because of RCSP star Inteleon engine.

Brit:

I like it we've seen it. It's like, we've, we've experienced the, the sort of next like normative shift and supporter counts because it seems like a lot of decks, not always just, um, yeah, again, like you said, it's, it's not always Inteleon, but even the liberal decks tend to be built this way. And everything just seems to have settled on like a 2, 2, 2 split, even like some of the other, even like civic, Coons and things like that can kind of play support accounts similar to that. Um, and like the strange to me, like looking at the list, a lot of the lists, especially too, like that was one thing I noticed and I'll probably, I'll probably hit this again when I talk about my own experience in Indy, but like Marnie counts really seemed to have gone down to like, not all of them, I would say probably most lists are playing too. Um, but a lot of, a lot of the top lists really are only went with one and then like contrasting you to so. Like meal lists. I saw the clip Morris's new list was playing one morning too. Um, and so, yeah, that's definitely like an interesting place, but I think there's like liberal is just a big part of that story too. Right? Like we, we haven't had that, that kind of support Pokemon in a couple of years now. And given that it came out like with ultra ball too, that's sort of like this engine in and of itself. So yeah, I think it's just kind of a combination and I guess also really worth mentioning them. Part of the two, two suits story is also power pad. Everything's playing pal pad now as well. Um, and I guess, yeah, it's just these like, especially too, like the Inteleon decks are just, so you don't, you don't need to dig, like, because you have such access to the cards, the exact cards that you want. And so like, why not just play with perfect resources every game. And so you just have all these, like, you're, you're far more meticulous, um, with your resource management and things like that, because you do, because for one, like another part of it too, is like a lot of the niche supporters are doing stuff that like your, your heavy draw supporters would be doing for you too. It's like, do I play the sympathy as ambition? And like, hope I hit what I'm looking for. Just like, Reihana again, I'm gonna go grab that special energy that I knew. And so like, it's like a combination of all of these things. It's just like, there's all of this lens is just new forms of consistency. And then like the other supporters are kind of. Just really going well with that at the same time, too. And so it's just like search, search, search particular search without needing to, um, just rely on the draw instead, which is kind of outside of the Zoroark here. That's where we've been for the most part recently.

Mike:

This might be a really nice segue into Dan talking about your deck and how you guys built it because your guys' list actually does kind of play the more traditional consistency counts with, for research three Marnie. So maybe talk to us, talk to us, I guess, initially about That And then you can segue into the deck building process more generally.

Dan:

That was actually thank you. That was exactly the transition I was going to make is because literally are so Kevin Krueger, uh, just referenced Kevin Kruger at 17th, and then Reno as Camila Rina's on the team with me. He's one of our local guys got 16 and the three of us played the same 60. So I am actually the under-performer among the three other thoughts. And I'm very happy about that. So it was exactly like you were saying, every deck plays three or four draw supporters. They have all the Inteleon searched out. And I guess conceptually for me, that is super cool. And if you are Pablo Mesa or toward, you can go get exactly the thing you need every single time. But my thought always with that is you can do that. If you need one to two extra pieces, if you don't have the third piece, you need the energy, whatever in your hand, That's great, but then you're getting out the one morning or the run research or the thing to try to draw into it. So the approach we kind of took with the deck was let's just play Pokemon. Like let's just be very boring and play a very like old style Pokemon deck. And we're going to play a draw supporter, every turn we're going to be able to Crobat for six, we're going to be able to live many on out whatever support we want from our deck. And then just set up liberal for late with the idea, just being that RCS will get you what you want. And RCS hits really hard. And then you just have the right attacker for what she needs to do, and just you overrun your opponent because if they're trying to drizzle for a Marnie turn to after just benching a Sabal in RCS, turn one, then we're going to be miles ahead on board, stayed on attackers on everything like that. So the idea basically was to just be boring and play Pokemon of old.

Brit:

That's really refreshing to hear, like, as something I think I've written about a time or two, we really just sort of like conformist with these things. So often, like it's like without doing the due diligence, it's really hard to know. If I, you know, the supporter camps that do become normative or actually like the best or optimal, or for, you know, it's just the case where that's what you do. It's what everyone does, because it's what everyone does. And so like seeing, seeing, uh, you know, seeing the supporter shift into this two to two and saying like, oh, we don't like, we don't just have to copy that. Like we can sort of, you know, stick with the old way the tried and true. It's like, I mean, I think that's just like, again, another, another Testament to the format that there's, um, multiple paths just in your deck, construction alone, that, um, seem to be very viable and like, I, I I'm sure to like, sort of the particular illness of the cards that you need, um, Well sort of depend on the support account, not into like the drill, I think is the sort of obvious stand out there being like, you have to be hyper focused with those and like naturally to the show, like the heavy draws and doing anything for you there. So it would make sense that like that deck probably does need something like, um, like what we see in these RCS Inteleon Beedrill lists, whereas other decks, um, maybe in the unit, even the RCS member I'm on still kind of play the same support account as the RCS Inteleon ones too. But like, that's interesting to think about just like moving forward, like what decks can deviate and what decks really do you need to stick to? That's kind of like new development, too, like, I guess just to finish that thought you just mentioned in Crobat in Lumina and I think a lot of those, um, The two prize, like support or a Pokemon are all really pretty good. Even like underrated, like Lumina. It's kind of astounding to me that it's like a three, four, maybe even $2 card. Um, and it's just not very popular. And again, I think that's, Inteleon more than anything else. It's just so many centers right now, but it's, it's really very good. And I think is really very good too, especially for like how many, how many decks they're playing pal pad now, like I think elder GOs is in a good spot as well.

Brent:

So Dan where we're like, uh, we're like 37 minutes into the pod, so we should get the whole story on like Carbonite. Is this like new Metta? Do you recommend it? Are there cards that you would change? Uh, is it the greatest tech of all time?

Dan:

So, yes, the last question, uh, Carbonite is not a good card. I really need to say that out loud for anyone who's like Corbin, I breaks the Metta. It does not, it is a very boring card. So I'm actually going to go like back to UIC. So Kevin Kruger and I went to UIC and we were planning and building a deck. So what we played for UIC was basically the deck we played in Indy just with Lucario B on. Of the core of the night. And so the deck was great. Like you could handle every matchup. The only thing that struggled with was wins, caught a single pricers and control. And so from my UIC run, I played Frank Persa round four, and then the very next round I played a pure, like Inteleon dark single prize box. So I'm like, cool. Oh two, like after being in three. Oh, this is fun. But the deck function really only outside of that. So when it came to Indy, we were like, the, the deck works. Like if you don't hit two auto losses, like the deck does its thing. So like you guys were saying with Urshifu though, who Urshifu felt like it would be super popular and everywhere. And even if it wasn't. Since it felt like that I assumed everyone would be playing who Bobby and Manaphy. And Dunsparce so trying to go in play in Lucario V everything that counters Urshifu counters Lucario V minus Manaphy. So it seemed like we were kind of setting ourselves up for failure, especially locals Thursday night, I played against two Sylveon and just said, this is ridiculous. Like there's no way this is going to go well whatsoever. So we had the super surprise tech for winds. The cop was blaring and stunned, Fisk to be, which is also a horrible card in case anyone was curious. So Friday morning though, I get up and I'm exhausted. And I'm like, this could be like, I really wanna figure out what to play. And like Carbonite V max just came to mind because why not? The, and I say that because the reason we played Lucario was it had base damage of two 40 against fees, which is higher than pretty much anything else that's currently played right now, minus mew with a bunch of power tablets or mobile. So with two 40 plus a belt plus a Zigzagoon ping. You want to try to be star. And if you aren't playing RCS just with a belt, you want to shout every other Vistar. And with, if you're just playing a bass B, you want shots, everything. So it was really, really good against miscellaneous and like, obviously want to plan for the first, like top three or four decks, but you can win or lose just on miscellaneous. So when we were going into indie, we were like, all right, we can't just take an auto loss to wins a con. Uh, but we still think it's so important to have that like, just baseline, very boring attacker. So reason I thought of Kortni V max was still saying two 40 base attack. Uh, it is 320 HP. So it's now the tank, highest guy in the deck, which can be good and actually is super good against Urshifu. If I had played one, uh, the abilities also incredible against Urshifu can't quit shooting it. So you get down to one prize left to go. You go in, knock something out with your core Nivea, max theoretically. And the only way Urshifu gets over it is if they Moltres boss, because Moltres belt is only 300 and then they can't ping for the last 20. So it's good. Their free retreat was just nice, but really it was just a very boring attacker to cover things. And to add one more note with that, the reason we went with that rather than just try and be Zamazenta and, uh, zap dose and all that is if you don't play against something where that type advantage matters, like the cards are so bad because you have a max damage output of like 180 or one 20 or one 70. So you suddenly have a just super underpowered deck against flagon B. And so what do you do again about that then? So Corbin night seemed like the best choice, and I say the best choice Reno told me the whole day that I gave him a bad deck to play while he was 7 1, 1. It's not a great card. I do not recommend Corvin as the Metta breaking card. It just, it fit the exact need we had there because it had all the attributes we were looking for.

Mike:

That seems reasonable. So what, what about the rest of the deck? So you have the Carbonite, you have. The Crobat lines is that mostly. So we've actually talked quite a bit on the podcast about the Crobat V max. And initially the first time it showed up, Natalie was like, oh, it's just there to make pro bat into a BMX. So it's not worth two prizes and E's not easily killed, but it seems like that's obviously not the case at this point. So why, why Crobat V max.

Dan:

Yeah. Um, I can just roll through the attackers real quick if, uh, it makes it more efficient, but so Crobat BMX is there for you primarily because it's not, it's nice that Crobat now doesn't get one shot. ERC is, but it for two dark in a color list at one shot, some UV necks, like no matter what. So that's incredibly. And with Hoopa in there too, who was just such a good card cause against mew, you load up a Hoopa and a Crobat with your first, uh, trendy, Nova new picks. One's right. Honda. The other are attached to the other and then knock out the movie max. And then if you can do that in Marnie path at the same turn, you're probably in a good spot. So it's obviously a camera on the market, but you know what I'm saying? So it's really good for those two. Um, Crobat DMX is also incredibly good for rabbit strike Mallomar because against rapid strike Mallomar all you do is stealth poison over and over again into a single Prizer. And then they, uh, they can't do anything cause they only either play to escape rope or one boss. So if you stealth poison into a single Prizer, they have to draw with whatever they have and boss up your VMs X to take the three prizes. And then in general, it's just a nice backup hitter, but hoop was there for mew. Oop is there for. Um, and then core tonight's really the only other attacking line. And like I said, as big and boring, but, uh, it turns out if you play poor, when I'd be max, you're going to be Windsor caught. So it was really nice for that match, but then just anything else that came along.

Mike:

Um, what, so I noticed this obviously is not an Italian deck, and we've talked about that, that, you know, you wanted to play a more straightforward draw power. So my question is some of the one abs like even the apps, like Path to the Peak and the Reihan and the Avery, for example, like how accessible are they, if that makes sense? Like, do you find them when you need them? Like, is that kind of an issue? Is it even worth playing the, these one off cards? Like what about that?

Dan:

So I think. So Lumina, Leon's a big enabler of that because if someone doesn't have path down or something and you need your right hand, or it's a great turn to Avery, like you can just go get it. And it's a good, like, my opponent just took a knockout and a core of an eye. They have nine cards in their hand. I can go the mini on for Marnie, put a path down and then like put myself in a better spot. Uh, same with just going to get boss for game. The Avery was really just there for you and for rapid strike valley, because it's just so good to then like mutates a knockout. You knock the board down to three, put a Path to the Peak down, even if, and if you can take a knockout, even if they have a stadium in hand, their hand is huge and only have three Pokemon on the board. So unless they just have what they need wrong hand, it's very, very hard for them drawn into it from the fact most of them had it wrong hand when I did that this weekend, but that's okay. Uh, the Reihan is just a break glass in case of emergency. If you're Urshifu with energy gets knocked out, going into your second turn, just you need it to play the game. So it was really only useful there and intermittent the, so I love Kevin. His deck building strategy is different from mine, where I would rather have three, four of everything important. And if we have under 12, one of his he's a little disappointed in the complexity of the list. So the one, one biblical the pumpkin, the Zig, like all of them were very useful and very helpful, but you didn't need them every game. And you like, you didn't need to set up the big roll every game because you played eight draw supporters of varying types. So it's just, they were all there for that specific need. And then they're not taking on a bunch of slots if you don't need them in a given match up or given game. So the things though that we did play a chunk of is you mentioned draw supporters, but then it was basics for all of our attackers and then it was energy. So I think most are. Yeah, we had one less, uh, fighting rather than metal in UIC because Lucario only needs one fighting a core of nine needs to metal. So when we were trying to debate what else to put in, it really was just the games we lose or because we don't see RCS energy turn wall. So what is the downside to just having more energy, to more likely see RCS energy turn one.

Brent:

I felt like even the stream games I watched, like when you mean people would with the energy attachment and RCS turn one. And you're just like, oh, the rest of the game playing catch up.

Dan:

Exactly. And when we were debating on our like last slot or two was, is this card better than another basic energy? And most of the time the answer was no. So just the other basic energy.

Mike:

Hm. So tell us about the, we don't need you to go through every single round, but just generally, what are the match-ups look like? How did your, were there any like, particularly interesting games, um, that kind of stuff.

Dan:

Yeah. Um, I played three mew BMX and I beat two of them. And the one I lost, two was a donk. And then on his last Genesek for four and it's like a 15 or 20 card deck. He got the ball, which like that just happens with me. And that's kind of the match of the, if they hit mellow at a knockout knockout, you just lose. But if they don't, you probably win the game. And then the other ones, like I said, I played one rapid strike Mallomar who is actually a local guy, like new player, but learning super quick and already improving since I've known him, Alec, and then the rest were all RC experience. So the ones that. Really stuck out. I played a RCS Beedrill flagon round one, and the moaning put the fly down flag on down. I was like, oh God, I made a horrible decision putting Corvin Ivy max into this deck. And then on his first ultra ball though, he discards a Sylveon V and I just say, oh God, I made a great decision. Not having Lucario V star in this stack. So it was super good match up really cool card. And then last round I played Charlie Lockyer who played a RC Beedrill Sandaconda B with Sylveon and that was super cool. Just so many pieces and so many moving parts there. So it like no round felt boring. I think I went to game three in six or eight rounds and just, they were all very good, very like fun games. And also pretty much all my opponents were super nice and super fun to play with. Like I just enjoyed everyone on Pokemon on Saturday. It was.

Mike:

Yeah, that's important.

Brent:

Uh, despite the, a couple of salty tweets on, uh, on the internet, I felt like a super good vibes in Indy.

Dan:

It just felt like everyone was there to have fun. I was excited to play.

Brent:

Brett, you want to talk about your deck process

Brit:

yeah. Yeah. It's like the listeners of the podcast. I was not intending to play my sort of plans that I've had for a long time that locked me out like that sell through like a day or two beforehand. And so. you know, I really lucked out and probably, I guess Vancouver is the other one, but like that there were still spots. Like I, I registered on Thursday and left Friday morning. Um, so I didn't really know what to play. I had, I had been testing thankfully, but I hadn't been seriously just like trying to one up the meta game or what have you. So I didn't really know what to play. Um, my, I talked a little to Mikey like about Mallomar and just like to another, another friend on that about Mallomar too. And it was just like, I think Mallomar is a good play, but I just don't don't think I have the time to learn how to sequence it well enough. And like a lot of it too is like, I just had like a ton of friends. I just was able to see so many peoples this weekend. It was great. And a lot of these people weren't playing. Um, and so I was going to be part of like that group and the not players just kind of hanging out. Um, and so I still. I guess prioritize the social side of things. And that was also part of too. I just like, I could stay up late testing trying to learn this or that, or I could just play something else. Um, and so Colin, a friend who I talked very often about on the podcast has actually worked on, been working on this toda kiss for a while now. I think, I think he's basically been playing a variants of it since the card has been released. Colin is like, I'm not very many of these players, but just like one we'll play like color he wants or the Pokemons that he likes sort of before anything else like before any other consideration and this, and this just happens to be one of those, a colorless Pokemon. And so I definitely talk the way I would sell. And I talked this way throughout the whole weekend. Tajik hiss is almost exactly how Dan was talking about Carbonite. Like it's not, it's not broken. We knew, we knew sort of exactly what it was going into it. We knew like some bad match-ups, but like overall, really some good ones too. And just trying to catch the meta-game at the right time. Um, there was just no fighting. No Urshifu so, um, That part sort of fell through, but sort of on the morning point, like Marnie of course being kind of one of the deck's biggest enemies, it's not like the number one, at least in terms of just like what everyone can, what, what everyone is going to do against you. No matter what deck you're playing, they'll just like Marnie and cross your fingers is always a good strategy against Hodgekiss. Um, but yeah, it felt good seeing all the, all the lists, um, really cut down on them. Like I felt good in the meta play. I felt that we beat with, like, I feel like our RCSP drill matchup is really, really, really good. Um, and like, this was one of those events that I just like, what are the top players playing? I can beat them for once. Like, I couldn't tell you the last time that happened. I'm always just for years, uh, a deck, a deck choice or two behind, uh, with the top players are always on. And so I think this was like lucky. Like I don't think it was calculated. Um, our, our CSB drone matchup is very good. Um, a lot of, a lot of Inteleon hate as well as playing Paracel so visual, visual doesn't do very much, if you, assuming they don't catch you the surprise with it. Um, so yeah, I guess, I guess on paper then just to go through the matchups or I guess first explaining the deck for those, you don't know, there's really not a whole lot going on to it. It's just kind of like, it's not a control deck, I guess. Like, I, I thought it would play a little more like a control deck, but it's more just like an attrition deck. You just like do kind of piddly damage the whole game, but that's, Sharon's care over and over and over again. And like kind of just eventually win a prize game. And then there's the Jolteon memory capsule behind that and a couple other, um, the other Pokemon where, um, I actually put in the glare and Moltres, which I actually thought it was really good. And I, I think going forward it needs something like that. Um, but then the other cards are Eva toll that knocks off all the special energy and then the rapid strike LABA fat, which is, which is also very good. Um, and that's, that's actually a really, really key part in how the deck is good. And so for those who don't know what that car does is for a double color lists, it places damage counters on the active Pokemon equal to the amount of damage on one of your bench Pokemon. So here's like, and then, so, and here's a scenario where like, you don't have the loop or you don't need to, you don't need to share it's care that turn, and you just like have a toady kiss was 250 damage. Like you knock out an RCS or maybe something better with it too. And it's just like something it's always good to have some, not, not very much can, one shot told you kiss mew, mellow at a that's about it other than like lightening Pokemon. Um, and so I guess to get into my tournament is that the round one, I had a really good. I really close series with RCS liberal, where I, like I made a slight misplay that may have cost me the game, but it still would have come down to Marnie's B he played three or four Marnie and put two back in with PA palpated to it back in both games. So he knew what he was doing. He was a good player and ended up losing a close one. And then round two, I played against an electric deck and it was just kind of done at that point. Like, I'm just like, I'm not going to win seven straight from here. And like the electric deck, I actually tied with the fluffy toolbox thing. And there, there were a newer player who actually.

Brent:

the only lighting deck, the in a thousand people

Mike:

Yeah.

Brent:

great

Brit:

be interesting to see. I mean, surely people surely a couple of people played Jolteon, but yeah, I'd have to be curious to look, but they were a newer player and it was, it was interesting. And sort of like, I guess, like nerves or something, things you just have to deal with as a newer player. I was, I was really very, it was their first regional is first regionals. I was really very impressed with his sequencing. Um, he made, he made a lot of plays that actually surprised me. Um, but he was just forgetful. Like he didn't, he wouldn't remember the DynamoDB basically. And like, I shouldn't have tied down. I should've lost in about 10 minutes, but we played a long three game series or rather he won, um, he won game two on his turn to have time. Um, and it was a one game one. Um, and then after that, uh, uh, beaten RCS a at AMU, and then I lost you and other RCS. And so like, I don't know if. Really how it shakes out, but the RC is liberal matchup is turns out to be like pretty hard, I think. And I think this is something that a conclusion that I think Brent reached as well. And it's like, I don't, there's nothing like particular about it. That seems to go wrong. I just like in every series I had with them, they were just like so much, just so much tempo the entire time. I was just like, I just basically like, couldn't miss a beat in my looping and I, I would on a Barney or something like that. And so I think that. Just kind of the unsolvable problem of the deck is just like, um, there's, the Marnie's are just sort of always going to be bad, especially too. Like, I think that, and this is like, we're there we're this deck to be popular. I think this is, this would be your strategy against it. And it's not necessarily that you like need to Marnie every turn, but you need the Marnie's and when they have 40 cards in their hand or something like that. And like, because at that point, like it's just garbage, that's left in the deck. Like if there's just nothing, like all this left in your deck is the supporters that you didn't need and like the search cards that you didn't need. And so that's like a big problem too. If like Marnie were a judge you're shuffled dry would be a significantly different problem. Um, Yeah. I don't know if there's really too much more we're saying, oh, that's really did very well. There was a couple, there was another list, a couple other lists floating around that did a little bit better than us. They were playing like crushing hammers and things like that. And so I think, I think it's not something I really think I have on my radar anymore. I know Colin's going to continue to apply it. Um, it was, it was, I enjoyed playing it and it was just something like, like I said, I was just going to play something a little different since I didn't really prepare. Um, and just like, didn't want to play. I didn't have like a read on what I just thought there'd be too much fighting. So RCS was sort of never in my considerations. Um, but I, I should have, there was a lot of decks that I, like, I talked about that Ahmed and I tested about that. Like, people played, ended up playing like a lot of really friends next would surprise me, or at least felt like vindicating. And some of my ideas like, uh, Kyle, uh, Al from Indiana, I can never pronounce his name, but he's a very good player. He played this like RCS leaf beyond his RCS. Leafeon neutral with like a little dark still. And that's like, that's one of the decks that like Ahmed and I like theory too. And this was like, this seems like it could be okay. And just like, um, but yeah, I guess that's just more to the RCS point and it's just like, our status can make anything. Um, but yeah. And so I guess just to conclude these thoughts is that like, I think it's missing something. And so the, the, the comparison I had is to like the Gardevoir GX and Sylveon like, they get you, you get to this point in a lot of your games where like, you don't need to loop, but your damage is just like, it's not doing enough to progress the game state. And so, like, it's trying to find some other like attacker or something to be able to go into, I think is what the deck needs to look to do, because you really, you can really establish the Sharon Karen's loop, like really quickly, really easily. It's not hard to do, assuming you're not like, well disrupted and things like that, but it just like, there's like you get to this point where it just like your max sliding every turn still, but there's just genuinely nothing in your deck you want like, like I was saying, like the big Marnie point, like you have, you have all these cards in your hand, like, and you've, you know, you've. I had plenty of time to get everything that you need to set up. And so, like, the Moltres was really, really good just as like something else to have something else to start doing damage when like a Tajik kits would go down and to go with like the WABA fan. And so I was really, really happy. I played that card. No one else, no one else from, um, our group did, but I, it was something I just liked it. I was thinking about trying to fall asleep, um, Friday night and I just woke up and put it in just like I also too. I like trying to like slightly hedge against whims, the cot. I like put it another dark energy to this like sort of like mutually beneficial there. Like I'm playing the Moltres right now. So I might as well play another dark. And then at the same time to maybe be helpful against whims the cop, um, which actually on paper, like I thought would be the worst matchup, but it's really okay. And in fact, like someone from our group beat a Windsor cop pretty easily, he said, um, and of course hammer you got. If you get hammered out of the game, there's nothing you can do. Um, but you, you can attack for 90 for one on the basic really easily and wins, wins a cop. Can't kill you. So, and you, so you can just, you can loop the Tojo kids be, um, or even memory capsule. If you, if you happen to just like see that card before Whimsicott starts attacking, um, as well as just like having them all trays too. I think that's about it though. I thought there might've been one other thought that, oh yeah. I mean, I think I didn't play against any Inteleon backs and I think like the thought is that I think we're okay against Inteleon, like, as it is. So I think like the big, the big changes are like losing the Jolteon package for something. Um, I'm not sure what, I don't know what kind of other attacker efficient attackers could be out there, but big colorless you've had a lot of freedom, so I don't know really how viable the deck is going forward. It's definitely not bad. Like. It's mid, like a low tier two deck, something like that. Um,

Brent:

I, as you know, I felt like in our testing Jolteon was the best part of the whole package, man.

Brit:

I mean, I just never,

Brent:

three supporters.

Brit:

the Inteleon.

Mike:

Yeah. I don't know. Like I I've played a little bit of the guest deck as well. I don't know, without Jolteon, if you'll ever really beat RCS Syntelli on variants. Uh, just you, you're just going to have the same experience that you had against the RCS liberal, where they just have what they need when they need it. And they template you out and they out heal you. Um, cause like against RC is a big, put a big charm on you are maybe three hit Kao

Brit:

All right. Yeah. That's that's what happened to the RCS that beat me. I pro I prized my tool jammer and they had two RCS with 300 damage

Mike:

right? Yeah. Yeah. And

Brit:

game three, two. would win. Like it's right there. Like the game is mine, but you got me.

Mike:

Yeah. So like. They like every time they hit, you have to share in, right. But at minimum they get to soak two hits before they Sharon. Right. Cause you do 200. And then even if you're threatening the three hit kale, which is a big F um, they can share. And so if they're playing like to Sharon and palpate and we have three Sharon and to palpate, like the amount of healing is actually pretty equal, um, because of that. And so that's like the only way you really, I think can, can gain the advantage against RCS Inteleon is by shutting up there and tell you on making sure they can't, you know, get Sharon when they need it or they can't get the boss, you know, after you Sharon, to then boss up your basic, the. That's my only worry, you know, RCS Inteleon was the most successful deck, various VR variants of our seats and Italian. So yeah, I also agree that like, other than that, the Jolteon is like, not super great, but I don't know if you can really compete without it. I do really like the idea of the mattress though. I have been tossing around the idea of putting in like a small Moltres package. Um, maybe a little bit more than just one. Maybe you play two and a and the Clara. I don't know. I do think I have a lot of similar thought and I didn't play the deck at this tournament as well, but, um, I've had similar thoughts at protesting it, like it has potential there's something there, but I just don't know if it's good enough. Like, even if it's most ideal state, I don't know if it's good enough to compete with the big decks.

Brent:

I like where, where you started Brit and I like where you're going. Like, cause like the, a prize game is a thing you can do with that deck. And if you were able to do that, like game after game, that that helps.

Dan:

I don't I'm I'm the guest on the pod, but if you're already playing the Moltres of dark energy with anything, like a Sableye make sense, because you're already doing like a load damage output, but you get that on a BMX on RCS, you clear out the RCS, and then the moment he comes in, knocks out your Sableye now Moltres rates is just destroying things, so probably need testing,

Brit:

is interesting. I feel like it just like has to come with Reihan and in the format, which we don't fly. We certainly could. Um, I don't know. It'd be, it'd be hard to think about, but yeah, I definitely think like, you know, maybe look, another color is the answer it's it's I don't know. Every deco it splashes dark. I was just, I think just like sometimes just like the question to me, just like display the good version and sad. Like you're just like use it. It's just one of those. Um, I'm playing, you know, a couple of that for dark energy and to Moltres, I must have a good new matchup now. Like I think, you know, be a little more focused. And so I think that's a, you know, a good example sometimes too, of how it's so easy to try to cover too many bases, like in your deck building as something to talk about all the time, but like in my prep for Secaucus and a little bit for the Sabbat, and that's kind of what I've been trying to do. I think I've been trying to fit like too much into my RCS lists. Like, like I, I like wanted to do like dark and be drill or like, because there was, I was inspired by the UIC list that was like RCS, like Urshifu Beedrill and just like, what if I just did dark and be Joel instead, but I think B I think B Joe clearly needs like. The grass would be the heaviest, um, of the energy count. I think like, if it's your softer, it just gets a whole lot worse. And so like in the, in the littlest, from this weekend, like they played 6, 6, 5, or six KRAS and like one water rather wherever I see, it's just like trying to play enough dark for like the mold traces to be effective while also trying to play enough grass to like have it when you need it. Um, for the whole combo is just like too much. So yeah. Yeah.

Mike:

think, well, so kind of like another moving away from Toby guests a little bit the Beedrill I know you guys, Brent, I know I saw you post that on our agenda. The Beedrill variant obviously did quite well. Six out of six. I think it was of the players that played it made day two. It wasn't like that bashful of a list beyond the Beedrill like it basically just straight RCS Inteleon with the Beedrill. Um, you know, there's no other attackers.

Brit:

Yeah. Not like, not like sort of dedicating like a ton of space to like combo things, to make the combo go off. Like. Meow Elara era and things like that that are in like, in like cram amatic. Cause that's like the first lists or the, like the RCS flagon. Beedrill like, they're very sort of just like keyed in to that like heavy trainer, like triple energy search, um, which is, and now that was part of my struggle, just knowing how to build it. Like I'm looking at this list, I'm looking at the, the top 16, the Japanese player, um, UIC and just like, do I need, does it have to have the Cramorant Maddix is just like purely Inteleon enough. And I think now I have, now I have an answer thankfully from Raul and Isaiah and so on Sam Chan, that list doesn't mean it's just like, it doesn't need anything else. It was like be able to do it. And like, I think that makes sense because it's like, like with the other less, I think like it's, you're like so more focused on like during it.

Mike:

Um,

Brit:

Turn it like early and that's how, like, that's the reliability for it, but Inteleon has just like more just like, I'm not going to do it fast, but I can probably just like, I'll be reliable at doing it. Like throughout the game. I'm just like piecing, piecing it together. And then just like you top deck the right, the right piece. And then just like one designer or one Inteleon like gets either ass. And that's like, how so he can move to colo plays too. It's just like, it's a lot, it's a lot of pieces, but you just need, like, you, you play a Melanie for like one of four cards and then you just pop off from there and it's like a similar experience. I'm sure.

Mike:

Yeah. I'm surprised that like, just running Beedrill is, and I guess, I guess it's, like You said though, it's not, you're not dedicating that much space to it, but I guess I was a little surprised that we drill is just worth it just by itself. Um, you know, I watched them, I didn't see them playing Antony mew, but I guess it's good in the matchup, you know, I suppose. Uh, but the big thing is I was impressed at how good it was in the mirror match. Like you are, even if they go first and get the first, uh, you know, 200, the threat of just immediately knocking out their first archivist is that's a pretty big threat and it's a pretty big tempo swing. Um, so this is pretty, it's pretty cool.

Brent:

Yeah. You know, it's obviously we knew coming out of UIC and, and watching Frank do so well, uh, uh, hard counter and special energy is a thing that like people get value out of B just different way to hard counter, special energy.

Mike:

Yeah.

Brit:

And like, they, it hasn't okay. Or they're attached to that. Like more like I can kill basically the Inteleon online and trade trades with a lot of the one pricers. It's not great for you. So you have to just spread the energy, but like it gets the job done. Doesn't it?

Brent:

I mean, you got to watch Isaiah use it against Piper on stream because it's good against Mallomar.

Brit:

Right?

Dan:

Also one shots hoop, a V I found out round one, which was.

Brent:

Uh,

Brit:

Yeah. Yeah. One of these days I'll remember that all these dark quick homeowner week to crass.

Mike:

yeah.

Brent:

yeah. It's chaos, right?

Mike:

Yeah. Moltres as well. And we'll just be,

Brent:

Yeah. Yeah. So, so in that way they, they, yeah. They're able to squeeze like a little bit of a kind of other educates value out of it,

Mike:

yeah.

Brent:

which isn't it.

Mike:

Yeah. Um, Dan, are you going to New Jersey?

Dan:

I am. Yeah.

Mike:

Where is your preparation going to start? Are you going to continue iterating on the deck that you've played or do you think you're going to explore some other things?

Dan:

Um, I'm I, my skillset as a player is I'm a terrible deck builder, and I'm also horrible at calling. Like I think I'm, uh, the thing I'm good at is actually playing the game. So when it comes to something like this, like the deck I played at Indy clearly works. Like guys do even better with me. And I don't though see anything changing. Cause kinda like I mentioned, it's just a very boring deck. It's not trying to take advantage of some kind of thing in the meadow or anything else. It's just trying to play Pokemon better than your opponent. So I'm probably gonna play if not exactly the same thing, just two or three cards, or maybe swap out the core overnight for different attacker, just based on what we think will be good. Cause I mean, thing just works and whatever, I sit down against minus like a few select things, I can play the game against it and that's really what I wanted.

Mike:

Makes sense. Makes sense. Brit, Brent, what you guys are both coming. What are you guys thinking? Any thoughts?

Brit:

Yeah. I mean, I don't really know. I don't have, I'm not going to really like, like Dan saying sort of struggled to make metagame calls. I like, I feel like there's still space for the format to it to after at least like, I guess this issue, if your question is really confusing to me, like I need to look at the data and just see like, maybe just no one played it. Um, but yeah, just like, why did it underperform? It's I thought it would do very well. I think it's very good against a lot of the RCS decks that may top cut. Um, so yeah, obviously toward, almost won a tournament with it, just losing the whims of cot in the finals and, um, Bilbao. So like, and I actually, I actually don't know if I've seen his list to know how it differed from Z E U list or like, you know, what, what changes it might've incorporated from Gestapos and so on.

Mike:

Yeah, it is a little different, um, the big change, it is still mostly towards less. So he still has like the activity. He still has the metal jam, but he did bring in the Moltres V. So that is now in the list. Um, other than that, not really too many changes. He also brought in a choice belt. I don't think he had that before. Um, and Gustava did, so those are the two big changes, but other than that has pretty much the same. Um, I've been playing that since he posted it yesterday. I played like five or six games with it today. So it feels really good. That's kind of my fallback. Um, if I don't find anything else that I, like, I think I'll probably just play Urshifu. It's kind of my type of deck. It's got a lot of different options and kind of like a counter deck to the Metta. So I really enjoy playing it. Uh, I'll kind of be messing around with that. I'll probably mess around a little bit with Toga kiss as well, just to see if I can find something. Um, and Balt keeps telling me that I should play ice rider, but I don't think he can convince me.

Brit:

thought I had maybe talked to Raphael last night. He was texting me about it again yesterday. And I just like, I just like made of a lot, like our argument. It was just like, essentially just like, what did them, something, it would have like a single place to get this point, if it were any good, other than online, like on paper, it seems so fine. And I think that's part of, part of the mystery as it's and it's just, but also part of the answer I think too, is that it's just too fair. Like it's just. effective in the way it needs to be, or in the ways that the better decks are it's close. Like I think very, very slight adjustments and it very easily could be the best tech, like a little more damaged or something like that. Um,

Brent:

Right. Good typing does not fix it.

Brit:

late. I know Les likes it a lot still too. So like, I mean, these people might still play it. I sort of on, on, on the topic of him, maybe I joked, I tricked the group chat on the thinking I was playing because flipped teeny deck. And I, because, because I did that several rounds, I'm just like, I would, I think, like, I think I would have gotten like started for hours if I had played flip teeny, like

Mike:

that's

Brit:

these dumb RCS to X happened. I mean, the flips are tangential. I'm just, I'm just taking I'm dunking people and things like that, every game. But. A lot of interesting decks. I'm sure if you just don't look purely at like, I guess like in Mallomar I think is the most interesting one to me actually. That's what I was thinking about on my car ride home yesterday. That was something I wanted to look into because Piper has done very well, very consistently with it, like basically a bit around shy of top eight, like a couple of times now, and is seemingly the only person playing the deck and just like of her success is so consistent. Like, like could I, you know, where another people playing it and things like that. And maybe like, maybe it'll just become bad if like the drills, like upticks a little more and it's play. But like, it sounds good. Like, especially against, um, you know, it's just like stays disruptive when a lot of the debt clusters are moving away from the disruption stuff. And I think that's like always a good kind of like point to hit in the meta game.

Brent:

Uh, you know, uh, um, my son's reaction, we talked about Piper's deck and then when we watched her Plaza on stream, he was like, cause like there's all the proof you need was like, when we tested the Sylveon VMX deck that came out of UIC, uh, you could just kind of lose tempo. Like you're just all in on getting a type advantage and doing the thing. And she's kind of all in on, like, I'm going to Marnie you and look at your hand and the new. And like, if it doesn't, if it, if like the magic doesn't happen, it's not like, uh, you, you don't have this super draw in and you're not able to pull off like big plays. You're just kind of all in on this. I'm gonna look at their hand after I Marnie them and they're gonna really need one card and I'm going to take it away.

Dan:

We, we played a lot of the Mallee V max part at UIC. The first thing is we tried to try to do that and it was good against a lot of stuff. Exactly. That, except for straight RCS, Inteleon all they need is a level wall or a evolution incense, or a drizzle off their top deck or something. And you just lose the game because then they Sharon's care and they hit into you and you can not share care of Mallee BMX. So you're just instantly way behind what they're trying to do. So it was a struggle. I'm impressed. You did that. Well, cause she's probably a much better player than me, but I struggled hard with that thing into the kind of matchups we were excited.

Brent:

Yeah, Ms. She only got off like one or two, a Mallomar V max attacks because the deck just seemed like any, she drew kind of poorly and it just felt so inconsistent, but like, yeah. When, when she did, she looked at her hand and he's like, well, he's got two outside results.

Mike:

Cool. Um, one thing I will recommend everyone to go watch is around 12. I believe of Bilbao it's on the limit lists. VODs like the limitless Twitch channel that it is Stefan versus Pedro in a 50 minute game one. Um, it is or Pedro playing Urshifu and Stefan playing like just dark, dark box. Inteleon uh, it is a. I think there's definitely some mistakes that are made a little bit on each side, but it is a very, very non-linear game, very grindy. And it was really cool to watch. I think that was probably the, the most interesting game that I watched between the two tournament's, uh, this weekend. So highly recommend going to watch that.

Brent:

Awesome guys, let's call it a pod.

Mike:

Let's do it.

Brent:

I was looking an hour and 20 minutes of a goodness for the people,

Brit:

Yeah, it was good.